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CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 12:45am EST
the consul let between innovators coming from central europe and those coming from the plateau which has fostered a suspicious negotiation and character they can see right of into the politics in bucharest to this day and i can go to every country, not every but many countries and talk about but. >> talk for a moment about germany. one of the images germany has natural boundaries to the north and south with the alps and further burden the east and the west is flat plains, so germany had a war over the century with germany or france or that area and poland and because germany was a continental power sandwiched between the maritime europe on one hand and the heartland towards the other it was always problematic which we it would go and how it would develop. i can across this book by accident in early 1989. the berlin fall with -- berlin wall would fall but november. it had occurred to me after reading this book and other books that the berlin wall or the dividing line between eastern and western germany was one. creation of german history that would reinvested soften different territor
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 4:30pm EST
juncture. are we going to go the way of western europe or the exceptional capabilities which attract entrepreneurs for over 200 years and this is why the huge growth of government is not about numbers of gdp. it creates dependence rather than independence. it does your sense of ability to solve problems. surgery of the free markets are sensible rules of the load and creativity, get a chance to get ahead and get these ever widening circles of cooperation, breaking down barriers and enabling people to realize their dreams or do we have the same for your bread into custody and wait for the government to rise in the street like you see in europe. worse at dynamism going to come from? yes its trust to verify, but you get the rise of the internet. they get richer and deeper. and enable people to do more. that doesn't come from government. that comes from what the opportunity, with the problem, how do we solve it? this way steve jobs touched such a chord when he died late last year is precisely people sense. this is living by james had hoped 10 but anyone which the lives of hundreds of mill
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 6:30am EST
with 18 months of kosciuszko's death this will was contested by three different parties, in europe, one within the united states at the time, when that surface three different subsequent wills that had been drawn up in europe, and so i don't quite understand, and in jefferson -- at this point he said this is going to really fall into a lot of litigation. he said i think it's going to go past my lifetime. he was right. and so he resigned as executor, and sure enough, this litigation continued. finally, wound up in supreme court. it was resolved in 1852 in favor of the polish descendents your this is 26 years after jefferson's death. so what i'm confused about is how did he ever have that money in front of him? the money was in the u.s. treasury in washington, and he never had access to it. and after that date it was tied up in the courts. so how could he have used this money to free slaves? and how did he have that option of no, i'm going to back off of this, i don't want to free my slaves. i'm really confused as to how he ever had access to those funds. >> the will end up in litiga
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 4:00pm EST
then even as it helps europe and japan revive, the question is, how does is keep reducing? because now you're creating your own competitors. >> at one point in your book to speak but the american empire, actually dramatic appoints. tucker added as imperialism by invitation. you want to talk to the lead of such a mean by that. >> it's actually a phrase that a sweet story and used for 1945. but it is largely not -- it's a matter of saying that the pentagon in the cna have, in fact, not been essential to the role the american state has played in the world as the treasury and the federal reserve have been. and that term empire which was coined for the way in which decapolis class of europe after 1945 facing strongly and much more concerning labour movements , the socialist threat that they posed, and they were concerned about a soviet invasion. turn to the american state to look to the american state to reconstruct a capitalistic. and in that sense it was empire building. when multinational corporations, the conditions by the late 1950's were found conducive to the flow in europe, that was
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 6:00pm EST
between. the seven years war changed the map of the world shifting national borders in europe, in africa, in india, and elsewhere. it leveled thousands of towns and villages in europe. killed or maimed more than a million soldiers and civilians, and bankrupted a dozen nations including england and france. remember, it started in britain's north american colonies, and the british government and british people naturally thought british subjects in british north america should share the costs of the war with their fellow citizens in britain. in fact, the government raised property taxes so high in britain that farmers rioted in protest and demanded that americans pay their fair share of the war. in 17 # 64, the british government extended to the colonies a stamp tax that everyone in britain had been paying for more than 70 years. it amounted to next to nothing for the average citizen, a pepny or two or a stamp attached to legal documents, publications, and the packages of non-essential products like playing cards. the harshest effects of this tax, however, were on members of three po
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 9:00pm EST
states to open a second front in western europe and the british, and roosevelt asked stotland to send the top general to washington in nabf 42 and in june of 40 to the issue a public statement saying we are going to open up the second front before the end of the war before the end of the year in 1942. we promised that publicly. and yet the open up in june of 44. that's partly because the british refused to go along with this and that the british get involved in the periphery in northern africa. they are serious but they didn't open up the second front with the united states brought instead basically to defend the provision higher. >> how does this link to the cold war? >> there's been to the mistrust between the soviets beginning during the war treatise of the seeds of the cold war are visible during the war. there are certain tensions of course because the fact that they delayed the second front know that the soviets had on their own largely defeated the germans after stalin and rather what pushing it across central europe and eastern europe moving towards berlin and they lost the mi
CSPAN
Dec 12, 2012 7:30am EST
union signed a treaty which removed thousands of nuclear missiles from europe. former reagan administration officials talk about the negotiations that led to the intermediate nuclear forces treaty. at this event hosted by the american foreign service association, it's an hour 20 minutes. >> okay. i think we're ready to go. i would invite everyone to take their seats. i'd like to wish all a very good morning. i'm susan johnson, the president of afsa, and i'd like to extend a very warm afsa welcome to you all, and thank you for coming to this important and special panel discussion, and also celebration of the 25th anniversary of the signing the inf treaty. special thanks of course go to our panelists and our moderator, and i should not talk, ridgway and burt, for sharing their experiences and reflections surrounding the conflict negotiations that led to this treaty which was a significant factor in reducing danger of the cold war. i'm sure you know all of these three eminent folks, but i would just like to say a quick word. ambassador rozanne ridgway was assistant secretary of
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 12:00pm EST
months prior to your book. what was happening in europe in june 1940? >> the war had started in september 1939, peter, and germany had overrun poland. hitler's idea at this point was to invade france and knock britain out of the war thereby. with the intent later on to invade the soviet union. he hated communism. this is one thing that was really part of his agenda. he was actually going to invade france in the wintertime, ma in november-december. he had to put that off because -- spent of 1939? >> of 1939. because of the invasion plans fell into the hands of the french and the british, soy put off the invasion until may, and he came up with a new plan. the old plant actually had been similar to world war i. it was going to come through belgium, along the channel coast, and down into paris. but he had to completely rearrange that, and he came up with you do, one of his generals, to think through belgium, but send the majority of these armored power through the our danforth further south and coming behind any french and british armies that went into belgium once the war started.
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 9:15am EST
company held and then fought for the rest of europe. as they fought for europe the next place they were at was breast which was there was a coastal port, a major fortification, the allies needed to resupply their forces and needed the harbor. the only problem was there was another gun issue. like pointe du hoc it was a suicide mission. the battery, the grass battery, as many people called it, had massive battle should sized guns that were buried most of the entire fortress was buried underground, picture kind of a four story building fortress that had been buried underground. there were elevator's going down, there was an entire hospital, mess hall, everything. to the naked eye, you look across a farmer's field and all you see is a tiny little pillbox, that was the battery and for months the men of "dog company" tried to find that battery and take it. that was their objective. the guns were devastating. they fought on hill's 63 in the men described to me how the shells came over like freight trains. the shells could destroy an entire hedgerow, small mound of earth and barry men ali
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2012 9:00am EST
general way and focus on just one section about demands on the burke that in europe. quince not very long ago americans and europeans pride themselves on religious toleration and understanding. and animosity and violence including such bloody episodes as the wars of religion, including as well be quieter violence of colonial religious domination by europeans in many parts of the world and added to that, domestic anti-semitism and anti catholicism and culminating in the horrors of nazism which implicated not only germany but many other nations as well. europe and the u.s. until recently liked to think these dark times were in the past and religious violence was somewhere else, in societies more allegedly primitive, less characterized by heritage of christian values. today we have many reasons to doubt that. our situation calls urgently for critical self examination as we try to uncover the roots of ugly fears and suspicions that currently disfigure all western democracies. in april of 2011 a lot affect in france according to which it is illegal to cover the face in any public space fr
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 8:00pm EST
of people in ben gadhafiments city, officials here, and then in europe, and they relied on local sources. the -- and the whole issue of how the united states became motivated to get involved is interesting, and, again, i go back to the issue of intelligence and what people didn't know about libya and what assumptions people were making. you know, it seemed like washington, between the the white house and state department, everybody had an idea of what should be done, advocatings on both sides, a ready group of the individuals, the power, and given rise to those looking for an opportunity to implement a responsibility to protect scenario that would succeed so that's a whole, you know, that's a whole section, again, as to what -- how did we come to intervene, and why was that actually a good idea? the next question, of course, is the one that everybody's talking about now, which i'll leave teem for questions, which is where is libya headed next? you know, with regards to what happens this benghazi, i think one needs to take -- regardless of all of the chaos that's happening, step b
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2012 8:00pm EST
systems of canada and other parts of europe like having a single-payer take care of all medical expenses? 's been a good question. we could probably be here quite some time to answer. from our vantage point, what we see if this is somehow works in canada and it does not have the care level here in the united states. even in the european countries like the u.k., they too have a one payer system. what happens it is cause long lines and health care is delayed in getting to people in the result is a dear. it is a more simpler model under one roof or an ape in a society that can access care at a single point and village across the platform as a whole. we were governmental sponsored plan because it does not encourage innovation and does not encourage competitive aspects. we hope you will get better going forward. >> slightly off-topic, [laughter] >> mr. brousard, i want to comment and give you some background first. i am a humana -- prescriber through my wife's retirement. and generally very satisfied with the program, particularly enjoy the silver sneakers relationship to encourage e
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 7:00pm EST
nature of contagion, a problem in europe, this ongoing crisis in europe could have a significant impact that could very easily send out a signal that it is a crisis. this last crisis is homegrown. but that doesn't mean that the next crisis cancer elsewhere. the financial crisis would be the first time. so we have that vulnerability and international shock that can bring a crisis home here. >> host: charles in gilroy, california. you on booktv on c-span2. what is your question for neil barofsky? >> caller: hello, are you hearing the okay? >> host: please go ahead, sir. we are listening. >> caller: i just realized that i got neil barofsky's book. i was on hold from the libraries for like six weeks. it's a popular book. the question is he mentioned that he is a democrat. at his high-level, i wonder how does that play. is it as important as he does his work? is it on his warhead that he is a democrat. would timothy geithner defer to him as opposed to a republican? how does that pedigree play at the very high-level of politics? >> well, i would say the only time it really benefited me in any
CSPAN
Dec 2, 2012 5:30am EST
tour europe and go off in one of those from places but they allow. i is really fun i had the kids during halloween completely surprise them and hear the kids at halloween their super cute. it was a conversation starter and i told the guys i was filming them in their costumes. you could also take still pictures as well and here's one of my favorites we can go ahead marlo and those are one of those moments 21 have a little bit of fun just think about it for your doctor's office to combine it for your elderly mom or dad. my folks are constantly atc13 doctor's office these days as she was overwhelmed by the amount of information she was receiving from the family doctor. this is a perfect gift idea gift and for teenagers to mention students my cousin is only 19 years old and he's a boy so i do not really know what they're into and so when i did was caught him a and and i am a hero now and here is ep was ordered him this pencam are. . >>host: you do not need an extra cable even disreputable ticket to goand teenagers are tough to shop but they will absolutely love the pencamwhether reusa
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 10:00am EST
society. as america stood on the edge of american leadership, europe entered a decade in which it convinced itself war was impossible. the book, grand illusion, captured the view that europeans were too advanced, too sophisticated to fight each other. john maynard keynes a code this with his famous observation about how the world was tied together, how an englishman could order from his doorstep products from faraway lands and have them delivered to him. it's kind of an early version of thomas friedman's theory which claims an advanced country that used computers won't go to war with each other. i call it the starbucks to pick any two countries that have starbucks won't fight. you know, i guess unless they have like a triple espresso to another observer, in a much different way, posited that war would be so bloody and weaponry so deadly that no one would dare risk a conflict. all of these assume that european leaders would be rational, a stretch even in the present day. this, of course, vanished in august 1914, a war sparked by one of the most unlikely of accident when ferdinand o
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 1:00pm EST
have in europe. this is not a parliamentary system. if you're in a parliamentary system, one government rules everything. it's one party rules everythingmeneverything.you hav. you have the speaker -- the equivalent of the speaker -- and the leader all in one party. and then you don't compromise, you put that out there and you get your program through. if there's a lack of confidence, the people can change parties. the next party comes in and does what it wants. that is not what we do here. sometimes i wish it was the form of government we had because at least there would be some action and you would know what to expect and you wouldn't have this uncertainty. because each party has its dreams, its hopes, its plans. and they would have the chance to get those policies through. we don't have that here.we have to meet each other halfway. because the house is run by the republicans and it will be next time. the senate is run by the democrats but it is not a supermajority. we have to deal with our colleagues. the house -- the president is a democrat. we have to work together. that'
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2012 6:00am EST
, are not as relevant as they are in the balkans. ultimately this means that europe and the united states have less leverage in the region. this allows other countries in the region to compete or political, economic and military influence in the region. i'm looking for to hearing eyewitnesses discuss this issue today. really want to hear what you have to say. i believe that armenia, azerbaijan and georgia, trustworthy allies of the united states better realize full well that their bilateral relationships are complicated and that they have to take their immediate neighborhood into account also. with only two open borders and one of them being with iran, armenia faces the constant threat of isolation. this is a for driver in managing armenia's relationship with iran. azerbaijan has a sizable diaspora in northern iran, by vastly different strategic social and political orientation than iran's leaders. despite a potential religious incident between iran and trenton, iran has a stroke decided with armenia over the contested region. furthermore, azerbaijan and joys the solid relationship
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 5:15pm EST
rates since wealth and poverty was published. drastically reduce tax rates. most of eastern europe now has flat tax is. in all these countries, revenues have boomed. there hasn't been a big craze this is anime and estonia. this in a past and estonia with 12% flat tax. the fact is supply-side economics is booming around the world. it's only in the united states that soul-searching and from this economics of enterprise. >> what is your analysis of what is happening in what donald rumsfeld recalled old europe? >> old europe is fallen with the indulgent dilutions of the welfare state. they've all accepted dependence on a show i've government and bass have destroyed the value of their assets. when you destroy the value of your assets, ultimately the human beings who make your economy go our investments and creations of work after. when you'd appreciate this asset, reliability is become impossible. if you unleashed the assets of your economy, allows the stock market to boom and thread began, then all of a sudden these liabilities they seem impossible today become manageable in the future. >>
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2012 11:00pm EST
adopting the paa that's why europe into asia because leaders here said they would like to do some sort of paa in asia. >> you asked a lot of questions in there. >> [inaudible] [laughter] >> well, let me talk about the sbx in general. you know, the sbx was built as a research and development platform. it was not designed to be in the long term missile ballistic architecture. there's benefit in research and development, but since it was built, my estimation is that the overall sophistication of the capabilities have grown, and it's grown globally so that the need to have diminished because they are mature of enough to have it. as far as the intercepters to be productive, you have to look across the technologies that we pursue, and recognize that the significant technology challenges that have been associated with that program, and really, i think you have to -- in the time frame that we've had to develop these systems, i think we've done the technology part of the -- of this ballistic missile defense have done amazing things in that time frame, to be able to produce the capabilities that
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 12:00am EST
world civilization heritage, including the religion of europe which we are talking about designating and recognizing the fact that there are some things called intangible heritage of the world. societies which have no rich culture did not thereby like the civilization and this is a policy which now unesco formally utterly appears to promote in his recognition and designation of a number of formally cultural aspects. the second one is of course the exponential increase in exchanges, cultural exchanges between the african world for incense and the european world. reparations. two may reparations are a truth. i have addressed the world bank and looking at reparations once and for all. why don't we get together and restore, return all of the artifacts from african continent and forget -- just returned everything. [applause] what bothers me about some of the exponents of reparations approach that they take is once you launch a new topic, once you launch it in public discourse you prepare for the ramifications of whatever position it is. you cannot align yourself and cannot pretend, in oth
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 8:00pm EST
after i asked about a map. armies have maps. they have maps of central europe. they have a map of the park benches and a fire hydrant. we did not have a map. do your best, he said. i looked up and my brother was an enlisted man in the army and he said, whatever you do as a second lieutenant, don't show indecision. just make in order and make a decision and move with it. so i grabbed my driver and radio operator in a looked out across one of president eisenhower's new interstates going alongside it and i saw phillips 66 gas station. there is the rest of the story. i grabbed him and went over and walked in full battle gear, gas mask, pistol and everything else up into this midnight on the midnight shift filling station operator. can i have a map of? you know, when the shows an edge of memphis appear? he jumped off of his stool, scattered around behind the counter and gave me a map and out the door i went. that was preparation number one. we did at least have the map and the lead jeep for 640 military policeman, 140 vehicles, the driver and elite jeep and the lieutenant have a map. c
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 7:15am EST
in the fields but i think that is a debatable subject. if europe fields laid you put in a grueling 14 hours a day but after work the night was your own. a house servant like paul jennings could be called upon any time to service those in the big house. of course for jennings the most galling part of it was when he had to go back to washington with dolley leaving his wife and children behind and after his wife died these are motherless children. i think that was his final motivating factor to say now, not later. yes, sir. >> one thing i noticed about your book is it seems to tie historical parks that don't appear to be related. the rescue of the great painting of george washington. it has occurred to me for a long time that by stating that in addition to the fact that it is a great work, it would have retarded what later became the arc of u.s./british reconciliation. that is not the purpose of your book but has that occurred to you? it has occurred to me for some time. >> they will indeed have enjoyed defiling the image of the father of our country. >> maybe but mostly because it be
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2012 9:00pm EST
letter of introduction from the british governor had been critical to the passage through europe. whatever the private feelings. they saved their criticism for french in to china. where they claimed to encounter racism on parallel. they routinely stayed at branches of the ymca, the equivalent for the grown men of boy scouts and cheered on by enclaves of indians who instituted the south asian over most of the globe. a consequence empire and kind of -- a different and similar manifestation of internationalism supported them in this clutch of circumnavigators. the international and support him on the later surfaced tour of the world. he came from a privileged russian family. that was of no help when he found himself on the losing side in the russian civil war during that revolution. as a white russian stranded stranded in china he was a man without a country. so destitute he made his way to shanghai, overhand and a mix of men and women in cast off slothing. he obtained a passport. a document that the league of nations had begun to issue to stateless refugees initially russians in 19
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 4:15pm EST
case of a 24-year-old schoolteacher. she went on a vacation in europe. she posted 700 pictures of herself, three of them she had beer in her hand or one in her hand and innocent photos. she is on a tour of a guinness factory and she lost her job as a teacher. you think that your 18-year-old or 21 or older child or grandchild can just take down a facebook page when they go job hunting, there is a company, social intelligence inc., which saves the last seven years of facebook pages. so then it becomes available to their employer when they are 22 years old. that, we have heard about. when i started doing research, i had no idea there was this whole other aspect, which was that what you do on the web is followed by data miners. i am a writer. i love dictionary.com. i've written books, but it puts 200 tracking mechanisms on your computer to follow where you go. google makes $36 billion a year, 90% of its income, from selling information. what does that mean? me that i look of a medical condition that health insurers can get that information and use it to discriminate. even the advertis
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 1:25pm EST
the things that happened since 1989 is the region that we used to call eastern europe has become very differentiated. it is no longer these countries no longer even have anything in common except for the common memory of >> more to pulitzer prize winner book tv is a location that the u.s. naval academy in annapolis maryland where we are interviewing some professors who are also authors. we are now joined by richard ruth, a professor here at the naval academy. professor ruth, what do you teach? >> i teach predominately sian history of why in pre-modern asian history. mostly i concentrate on thailand and vietnam. >> why is it important for students to the south asian history? >> it's very much engaged in that corner of the world we have many allies and partners that we are still working with come and many students at the naval officers southeast they are going to represent our interest there. so i think it's important for them to know south east asian history to be comfortable with some
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 9:00am EST
talk to them. now, law in europe is undergraduate. very few countries in the world have a graduate law school. but england, europe, undergraduate. so these orientation students were basically high school seniors ready to enter the freshman year of college. and so i talked with them. maybe 80 people are i said i'm just a scared he to tell you about the supreme court. and we started talking, and a student raised her hand, and she said, now checks and balances is very important in your constitution and the present checks -- who protects, who checks the coats? good question. not sure i had a satisfactory answer. [laughter] there is an answer. and another student raised his hand, and he said federalism is very important in america. but money goes to washington, and then it goes to the states with conditions. with grants and eight. doesn't this undermine federalism? in a student raised her hand and said now, chief justice john marshall was very much admired in the united states. for all his decisions popular when he wrote them? i said wait, stop. [laughter] i said, you knew i was coming. you
CSPAN
Dec 20, 2012 12:00pm EST
look to europe and say austerity there is not working. and i agree. an austerity program that's too quick can only make our problems worse. but i also see parts of europe that said by kicking the can down the road they can ignore their problems. and the only thing worse than austerity is the bond markets forcing a crisis upon your economy, forcing a crisis that would make a divide between spending and revenues more unsustainable. if we wait 3 years, 5 years, 10 years, 12 years from now we will be unable to safely deal with these problems. that's why we need a balanced and responsible deal now. after the election, many of my colleagues, particularly those on the republican side, have sort of publicly acknowledged that we need new revenue, has to be part of the solution. i believe even some of the numbers the president put forward in terms of revenue goals are too modest in terms of of what is needed to be put back into the revenue stream not to grow the size of government but to simply pay our bills. it is critically important that this new revenue is quantifiable, scorable, and main
CSPAN
Nov 30, 2012 7:00pm EST
year after. the pressures are between now and 2020 or even later is that europe has been in such a bad shape. that is, when you tie your monetary souls together and ignore your fiscal side, and when they get out, there's huge risks, but i would urge people in washington would not underestimate the price paid by the debt ceiling debacle of last year. it was not that we downgraded our debt and then our interest rates didn't change. that's a misreading. what happened is that the financial markets are spooked by the uncertainty in washington and by the belief to win anything no matter how stupid, and let us be clear, not raising the debt ceiling on the table again is as stupid a policy as anyone can imagine. the whole debt ceiling doesn't make sense, and the idea you will not raise it when you need to is really playing some form of roulette that's not appropriate. there's a number of changes sense the act that i want to emphasize. in addition to the fact the financial risks are less obvious and pressing on the american public as was mentioned in the last session, the economy is interna
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2012 7:00am EST
europe face. i think america should play an important role in this. but right now i think our voice has been largely muted by internal divisions, by some ways that we do business in a government and outside of government, that's awesome. the main argument is it's up on us, and more is coming. changes coming. some of that will include islamist forces to figure how to best use our power to shape and influence them. >> thank you very much. on iraq, an extra bonus points if you can believe that -- >> a couple of close in points. first, we we think a luckily, made out to say myself, i think generally weak tend to project a certain bigotry of low expectations on muslims in the arab cultural world. which is those of us who are of various religious faiths here, we know the extent to which we practice our faith to this or that religious prescription, and we now that we've all pretty darn sure but we think muslims, they all pray five times a day, they never touched scotch. they all do, you know, every commandment that is in islam, and, of course, they all submit to the will of their local ima
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 6:00pm EST
the europe they are. in the wintertime, it was too cold to really venture out. so john quincy adams on his son had the sensational appetite for learning. on his own he studied it lame history of england, six volumes of edward gibbons, decline and fall of the roman empire. adam smith's two volume work on the wealth of nations, great economic word. he kept studying latin. he read the latin poets in cicero and avenue. he read the english poet. he had this insatiable appetite for learning. at 16 i was still studying uncle wiggly. but i read it in latin because i went to heal instead of harvard. >> i take it as a politician in our modern sense of the word female black the common touch. >> very few of the leaders of this country did at the time. they were all university graduates except for george washington and george washington was an autodidact commotion so fed 6000 books. this was an elite. constitution did not give liberty to the ordinary man. all it did was replace the king with the president. but it gave congress the same right. congress could tax. the constitution did not provide
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 10:00am EST
much time do i have? >> host: europe about two minutes to get into this. >> guest: i made a further two s-sierra because this gets extremely complicated. it basically comes down to a battle between publishers and amazon about how cheap e-books will be. sir can jump in if i'm oversimplifying. >> guest: i'll do my best to keep it simple as well. there have been a burgeoning class-action lawsuit, but things came to a head in april when the department of justice sued five or six largest publishers, essentially popovic 66 at random house and apple for what they felt were colluding and e-book prices through what's known as the agency model. very briefly, the agency model said the price is not retailers. before then, retailers like amazon and barnes & noble could set their own prices. the department of justice did not like that. in the wake of the soup, simon & schuster and harpercollins all settled and now we're finally seeing some fluctuation in those publishers e-book prices. mcmillan, penguin and apple continue to fight the suit are at a trial is set for june 3rd , 2013. the case still
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 7:00am EST
. >> they were comfortable, yes. >> what inspired rob cox two, six months before, go off to europe? >> well, this is one of the questions that fascinate me when i started researching the book. he was an idealistic young man. i knew that. he went to a school that, a christian school, and he was somewhat religious and felt that life was meant to be at more than just yourself, and to have meaning and be helpful to others, that kind of thing. there were a few less noble motivations i think. he was graduated from college. he had no other obvious plan, and yet what we would now call a low draft number. he knew that it was a good chance you'll be drafted drafted into the american army, which had resumed the draft in come at the end of 1940. but had no clear plans to actually go to war, and he wasn't too excited i don't think about spending the next couple of years training for military. so he was casting around for something, and i think this fulfill a lot of meaningful, fulfilled a lot of meaningful goals for him. >> how did he get from harvard to england? i mean, who did he contact? >>
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 1:30pm EST
much vaccine if you add anage haven't. this is not a controversial technology. it's used in europe, okay? if it's used in europe, it's not a controversial technology. [laughter] that was not allowed. secondly, at the last minute they ordered a switch from multidose to single-of dose vials. why? the reason is because single-dose vials have less thimerosal, the chemical which contains a little bit of mercury that the anti-vaccine crowd says this causes autism, okay? in 2009 this has been thoroughly debunked for years, and yet obama's fda gave in to that. and partially, as a result, we had a vaccine shortage. what was the outcome of the 2009 h1n1 innewspaper wednesday saw? 61 million americans ended up becoming infected, 274,000 hospitalizations and 12,370 deaths. now, i'm not a person who says barack obama killed all those people. i don't believe that. okay? i don't believe the fda killed all those people. but i do believe that our bad policies contributed to this outcome. and how many of these illnesseses and deaths -- and think of the money involved, the billions of dollars in heal
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 7:00pm EST
of introduction from the governor bond they have been critical to their passage into europe. whatever their private feelings, they say their criticism of imperialism were french in china where they claim to encounter racism unparalleled in any part of the world they had gone to. irritatingly stayed in branches of the ymca, the equivalent for grown men of the boy scouts and they were cheered on by enclaves of indians and especially -- the constant stated the dias pro-for the most of the globe remarkably a consequence of empire and counterweights to it. a different diaspora and yet similar manifestation of the internationalism supported -- in this clutch of circumnavigate errors, this international on his slightly later surface to her of the world. he came from a privileged russian family but that was of no help when he found himself on the losing side in the russian civil war during that country's revolution. as a white russian stranded in china the man without a country so destitute that he made his way to shanghai overland and a mix of men's and women's clothing. in shangha
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 10:00am EST
were captured in europe, when north africa, and there were transported into harm's way, not out of harm's way. so there's a danger to the detainees, one entirely of the government's conduct a detainee's making. instead, the hardest part of this and the claim that you hear repeated the most often include about my colleague is that the real reason why judicial review in that context does not make sense is because it poses a threat to military operation, a threat that the courts will actively interfere with military operations and that the courts should not do that. let me be clear, a point that if that threat were provable, that's interference were there it would be a serious problem. we now have four years of jurisprudence and the d.c. courts involving guantanamo detainees were the government had this very same argument about the extent to which judicial review would interfere with military operations, interfere with the ability of the government to conduct the war and terrorism in the to do with intelligence gathering. for the most part there's been a suggestion that has actually h
CSPAN
Dec 5, 2012 12:00pm EST
europe, also known as the helsinki commission, which i cochair -- which senator cardin cochairs, during senate consideration of h.r. 6156. the presiding officer: without objection, so ordered. mr. wicker: thank you, mr. president. and, again, i come to the floor today to support this bill. it has is very important two-fold purpose. it promotes normal trade relations with russia, and at the same time the legislation insists that the russian government adhere to the rule of law. it does so by putting consequences in place for those in russia who abusive human rights, basic human rights. granting pntr to russia is a big win for americans. if congress does not act, american workers, including millions employed by small businesses, stand to lose out to foreign competitors as russia opens its market as a new member of the world trade organization. many in my home state of mississippi and around the country deserve to benefit from increased trade that this new relationship would bring. more jobs and greater economic growth are our potential rewards here in the united states. last year,
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2012 5:30pm EST
there's a big social agenda, you have a different form. anyone europe, southern europe, northern europe, different forms, but in northern europe, the informed capitalism, where the government believes in strong social safety net, believes in paying for health care, believes in playing a role in determining what businesses grow or fail, and they're creating more jobs than we are. so we have to be careful when we, as we sometimes do in the united states, get up on our high horse and say we understand capitalism. actually what's going on in the world is a competition between different versions, and if our version produces more inequality, produces less growth, it's -- is seen as less fair and others are seep as more fair and producing growth, who do you think is going to win that arguement? >> host: a lot of people say the northern european countries, norway, sweden, et cetera, is socialists. is socialism a term that is outdated? >> guest: i think it is. let's take an example. car companies going bankrupt during the last cycle. america, big capitalist country, doesn't have a social
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 10:30am EST
of western europe, we were the most egalitarian of countries. now we are the least. we have outstripped everybody else because our capitalism has been a relatively robust. when capitalism can do it's thing, it polarizes. when it polarizes it creates an awareness that is probably also occur to you. if a growing number of people i'm having a hard time and a shrinking number of people are collecting enormous wealth, it will occur to the two of them that this is happening. and in the one group there may develop their resentment against the of a group. and if you have a system like capitalism coexisting cannot that you have to, but if you have a system of capitalism coexisting with the democratic society in which everybody has the throne and the following in sight is going to occur to a lot of people. we, the majority, are really getting screwed in the economy. the way to fix it to reverse it, to offset is to use the political system to get the result. in the political system weekend rearranged so that what we lost in the economics as it became more and more unequal is recouped b
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 8:45pm EST
the cia after clandestine meetings in europe and latin america. he told the cia he disposed fidel castro, turned against him and wanted to assassinate him and this was music to the years because they were under tremendous pressure from the kennedy administration especially bobby kennedy to get to the term to get rid of fidel castro. so he was recruited to the agency and he was trained in demolition in france by the cia officers, he was trained in the secret writing and he was their greatest hope to assassinate castro. >> he turned out to be a double agent. he was working for fidel castro all along. the cia did not know this. the kennedys did not notice pittard i approved this i think beyond a reasonable doubt. i have sources from the cuban intelligence that sought documents in havana that proved this and there are declassified cia documents that give me the added assurance that he was a double agent working for fidel. he knew there for not only that the cia was trying to kill castro, but that bobby kennedy and therefore jack kennedy or behind the plodding. >> did you ever meet wit
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2012 11:00pm EST
there is a loved one in europe like that is visually impaired, you can and you can these settings will be large, you can have this big setting for official leak impaired. >>host: look at the response by the way and i know, i wish we had more of these and we do have noted this pointc13 in on 2000 and that is what i we would sell the first airing, this is a home run. you have to remember on hsn.com even at a higher price people love it. [electronic voice] >>guest: download map not a quest for free that is one of the things i downloaded, you can buy office applications, if you wanna do year xl, our point, you can download office programs and what would love to show you, we have
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 12:00am EST
coast of georgia and battles in canada and western europe, all over the place but again the majority of battles are fought here. the really interesting thing to me is that most of the battles fought here, the big battles are lost, they are losses and the really incredible achievements, logistical achievements are migration. so that is probably the number one reason that we don't celebrate this area in full force. >> the other extraordinary thing you say is 8000 rebels were killed in action. 11,000 died in the prison ships. most of those are in new york. one ship has 7000. >> i think a total of the two prison ships that are off now the brooklyn navy yard two prison ships had something at 11,000 people that died on them. again they are not the people who you would necessarily build a giant memorial singularly. those prison ships, washington protests them all through the war. the people on the ships, they were not being fed and they were dying on the ships. if you were an officer or you had some money, but if you are neither of those things, then you died on them. the thing is, after th
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2012 1:30pm EST
seen as evil and people and make fun of them. in europe they make and how fat americans are. small things, however, are seen as somewhat heroic. terror groups are seen as freedom fighters because they are small. 0 w s because of a tiny faction is seen as cool. activism, dana terry noe -- the media embraces david over goliath even if david is evil. if america were a house be left would root for the termites. i used that before. i thought it worked. i am not trying to say that the left are bad people. i am just saying they aren't people. by the way -- no, no, not true. i used that, why i say that is i use that because that is what they do. it is time we throw it back at them even if it is a joke. they are people. they are people. they are some of my favorite people. they don't own the turf that is ridiculed. why is the cool versus on cool thing important? the reason people like barack obama is he is cool. he beat a war hero, a community organizer, how did that happen? because he was cool. it was cool to vote for him. the culture embraces fake coolness over real achievement. kids woul
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2012 12:00pm EST
home. our competitors in china and canada and europe are not taking advantage of these opportunities because they have pntr with russia, they already have it. we are the only w.t.o. member missing out on these opportunities. if we now pass pntr, we can level the playing field and compete, and if we compete we will win. we sell more beef, we sell more aircraft, we will sell more trademarks, we will sell more medical equipment and our banks and insurance companies will grow. pntr will give our knowledge industries greater protections for their intellectual property and our farmers will have new tools to fight unscientific trade barriers. if we pass pntr, american exports to russia are expected to double in five years. this bill has strong enforcement provisions to help ensure that american farmers, ranchers, businesses and exporters get the full benefit of pntr. and this bill has strong human rights provisions. senator cardin's magnitsky act punishes human rights violations in russia and helps to address the corruption problems russia now faces. in july, the finance commi
CSPAN
Dec 12, 2012 9:00am EST
we have seen unfolding all across europe. republicans have engaged in these discussions in good faith. we have agreed to make tough choices. the question is where's the president? where is the president? where's the only man in the country who can make it happen? well, it appears that with just a couple of weeks left to resolve this crisis, he is busy moving the goal post. instead of leading as he was elected to do, he's out campaigning and playing games with the nation's future. so my sincere plea this morning is that the president gets serious, that he put the campaign behind him and lead. if he does, he will have willing partners. the first sign is seriousness, seriousness about spending cuts. now, madam president, on an entirely different matter, yesterday i began the difficult task of saying an early goodbye to now six members of our conference who will be leaving the senate at the end of the year, and this morning i'd like to say a few words about my friend and long-time colleague, senator snowe. she has devoted the last 40 years of her life to serving the people of maine.
CSPAN
Dec 4, 2012 9:00am EST
. >> i just want to -- >> brevity will get gold stars. >> china economy, more oil intensive than europe, and oil coming to the middle east before that and a dozen chinese from libya, the question i would raise is the need for china to stabilize resources of oil and energy resources and the same kind of ambition to sustain that with the geopolitical force as we have, is that going to lead to conflict we are talking about? >> yes, sir. >> what about canada? may be a quick comment on the resource issue, i take issue with whether or not it is better to know what is there or not there. canada and the united states have an interesting discussion about the border between alaska and canada. [talking over each other] >> we were a lot better off when it was not how many barrels of oil will come to each nation's economy but i would like to ask a question as to moving from the flash point of the moment, a longer term issue, the indian ocean and seeing china bases in sri lanka, does india regard this as a legitimate protection by china of its sea lanes for commerce with significant -- does it see it
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2012 5:00pm EST
european commission, anybody can talk to try to get europe, both countries, as well as germany and finland, each with different points of view. also all the common view, they've got to find a way to work out all their differences to save the hero. and i believe they will. you can just see it, feel it, read between the lines, they are going to find a way. they will muddle through but they will find a way to get it done. these countries are also looking to us to be. and we need to lead. europe shows us the danger of uncertainty. we know the uncertainty just in this country. uncertainty leads businesses sitting at the sidelines. drags down investment economy, human capital, companies will postpone decisions next quarter. maybe the following quarter, not higher. now if you like to do a special with all that cash. we can keep people wondering what's coming down the pipe every three months. confidence matters. it especially matters in our economy. once we've resolved the cliff, we need long-term fiscal reduction so businesses can plan for the future. to get families and businesses certai
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 9:00am EST
off all commerce between the united states, england and europe. and so the president ordered them built in 1940, but the navy, um, decided that that was probably not a good idea, so they convinced the president that the scarce resources that were available at that time would be better spent on destroyers. and i think that if, if you look at the historical record, you'll see that that probably was a mistake. .. it was built in the tampa shipyard. there were 563 destroyed air escorts built. seventeen shipyards all across the country. it actually came late in the game, like a lot of them. this is 1944. it did a few escort's back and forth across the atlantic. one interesting thing that the slater did do, the only nazi submarine, the only you-book captured by the americans and will work to was captured by destroyer escort. they get a treasure trove of material, conference of documents, actually a half a ton from this you -- u-boat 505. one of the torpedoes was loaded on to this letter and brought back to america for study along with the all important in the machine, and that was the c
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 10:30am EST
in the -- battle some western europe's, but the majority of battles are fought here. the interesting, the really interesting thing to me is that most of the battles fought here, the big battles are lost, losses the really incredible achievements, logistical achievements are evacuation's. and those -- said that is proline number one reason that we don't celebrate this area in full force. >> the other x loughner side. about 8,000 americans were killed in action. >> but a 11,000 tiny and the prison ships. >> most of those are new york. 7,000 prisoners apparently perished. >> at think that to prison ships better off what is now the brooklyn navy yard, to prison ships have something like 11,000, it's an estimate. people bynum. and again, that points. they're not the people who you would necessarily build a giant memorial for singularly. but, yes, those prison ships, washington protested the malta the war. people on the ships were not being fed, barely being fed to my dying and the ships. and if you got off, if you were an officer or if you had some money, but if you were neither of those
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 4:20pm EST
, they were comfortable. >> what inspired rob cox to go off to europe? >> this is one of the questions that fascinated me when i started researching. he was an idealistic man, and i know that. he went to school there was a christian school. and he was somewhat religious and felt that life was meant to be more about than just yourself. be helpful to others, that kind of thing. there were a few less noble note motivations. he had graduated from college, he had no other obvious plans. and we have what we would now call a low draft number. there was a good chance that he would be drafted into the american army, which had we resume the draft at the end of 1940, that have no clear plans to actually go to war, he spent the next year training. so he was casting around for something. and i think that there's still a lot of meaningful goals for him. so how did he get from harvard to england. who did he contact? to that's a good question. well, he learned about his opportunity from his harvard club, which was sort of the equivalent of a fraternity at harvard. someone came to talk to the guys at t
CSPAN
Dec 20, 2012 11:00pm EST
size of western europe. i believe the estimates are somewhere in the 6,000, 5-6,000 deployed. there's more -- 5 or 6,000 deployed in the east. i don't know what the exact estimate of the congo military deployment in the east is. there's a vast amount of territory the military is trying to cover with 150,000 troops. >> still, i mean, we're talking about a force of a thousand, and so why is this such a big issue for the drc in order to be able to basically prevail in the situation? let me say a slight revision. i think probably today the m23 probably has some 2,000 or so troops. i think he has pointed out the size of the congo, i think graphically describe the congo as a country which is as large as the eastern part of the united states from the atlantic to the mississippi. it is an enormous country and since the split of sue can it's geographically the largest in of africa. the eastern congo is one of the most difficult areas in which to operate. it is an an area that is deeply forested in some places, double and triple canapes, it is also an area that has a large number of vo
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